Meet Our Artist Member Amy Wergelis

For the month of July, DVAA is hosting a members' exhibition to showcase all of the talented artists who comprise our membership. Here on the blog we'd like to feature some of these participating artists so you can learn more about their creative vision and their work!

Amy Wergelis
About the artist:

"Amy Wergelis is a Philadelphia-area artist and teacher. My work is defined by color and movement to create an emotional response. I teach studio classes in drawing, watercolor, oils, acrylic and mixed media. Class information gets posted on my Facebook."

"Distance" - Amy Wergelis

"Distance" - Amy Wergelis

To see more of what Amy's up to please visit her on Facebook!

 

Ona Kalstein
A statement from the artist:

"Travel Treasures: Peru" - Ona Kalstein

"Travel Treasures: Peru" - Ona Kalstein

 

"I am a published illustrator and retired art librarian, working in ink and colored pencil on vellum, specializing in personalized caricature portraits. I am also a DVAA Board member and recording secretary."

To see more of what Ona's up to, visit her on Facebook!

 

 

Trina Brand
A statement from the artist:

"I have been involved with the visual arts all of my adult life. I graduated from what is now UArts, taught art in Philadelphia for 30 years, worked with mural arts, and received numerous grants to work with my students. My work has been shown at Main Line Art, Wayne art center, Artists equity, and The Community Art Center in Wallingford. I have also won prizes at these venues. There are paintings in the New Heart Center in Lankenau and in the executive board room. My work was chosen for the new post-partum wing at Presbyterian hospital in New York My work is abstract....no matter the style of work,I am always aware of composition, color, surface, line....all are the basics for solid artwork."

"White on Blue"  Trina Brand

"White on Blue"  Trina Brand

To see more of Trina's work please visit her website: http://trinabrand.com

 

Rosalind Bloom
About the artist:

"Rosalind Bloom received an MA in Art History from Columbia University, and taught that subject in area colleges and universities. After graduating from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts she gave up the classroom for the studio and has exhibited regularly since then.

Collage and transfer print have long been part of my working process, and are currently my main form of expression. I deconstruct abstract oil paintings from an earlier period; cutting them into shapes that interest/please me, and then look for the bits that relate in some way. These bits are then collaged into transfer printed and mixed media environments. I love the unpredictability of transfer and its eroded, transparent, and painterly qualities. It is time consuming, but wonderfully meditative. At various points in the process I might use colored pencil, cray-pas, acrylic paint, ink, and water color washes, to accent, fill in, and unify the piece. Sometimes these pieces are of a serious nature. Sometimes they are just playful."

"Conversation Under a Pink Sky" - Rosalind Bloom

"Conversation Under a Pink Sky" - Rosalind Bloom

To see more of Rosalind's work please visit her website: www.rosalindbloom.net

 

John James Pron
About his "Interior Life Series":
 

“There is so much more to a human being than just seeing an image of a face.   Just as there is much more to a building than staring at a front façade.

“A façade can transparently reveal an inner life or it can obscure a most unexpected interior.  It can wall off or bury a significant past or it can project or imply a desired future. It can smoothly overlay complex mechanics or can deceptively hide intricate Byzantine interactions.  It can divide the real world between the rational and the emotional.  It can nurture and protect, but it can also isolate.  And it can transition to a spiritual realm.        

The collage technique is a process celebrating both/and rather than either/or.   New counterpoints old.   The photograph juxtaposes against the finely drafted line.  The atmospheric moodiness of sunlight and shadow contrasts with mathematical linearity of perspective points and measured grids.   Baroque fullness plays against Buddhist minimalism.  The concrete reality of “what evidently is” on the surface most likely disguises suggestions of past and present.  Facades alone rarely acknowledge metaphysical worlds, threatening situations, hidden hopes, personal triumphs or frustrating disappointment. These are all implied through the inked lines.”  

 

"Christina's (Dream) World" - John James Pron

"Christina's (Dream) World" - John James Pron

To see more of John's work please visit his website: http://www.johnjamespron.com