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Lucia Garzón Solo Exhibition
July 7th - 28th, 2019

Opening Reception: July 7th, 6pm - 8pm


Lucia Garzón is the winner of the DVAA open call for a grant-funded solo exhibition — generously funded by a donation from the Joseph Robert Foundation.

Artist statement:
My work investigates the intersection between my personal experiences as a first generation immigrant and the experiences that of my family who immigrated to the United States from Colombia. Through my exploration of print, sculpture, and textiles I begin to find my place as a queer woman between many different cultures and identities. My work comments on the experience of living in the margins and contradictions of these communities while calling attention to the experiences which put me here. Immigration and labor are main themes of my work, as I often pull personal stories from my dad who was an undocumented peach farmer in Georgia during his first months in the states. With these themes I explore the social and political acts of service provided by marginalized people at their own expense as well as their families. The idea of the American dream is contrasted with the realities of what life often becomes for those that immigrate here while also confronting the privileges and expectations passed onto the future generations of these people. Recreating and re-contextualizing physical objects used to represent the experience of immigrants allows me to unpack the laborish history of my family and many others which is the backbone of all things American.

Bolso,  Burlap, Plastic, Zipper, Reflective Nylon Cord, 2019

Bolso, Burlap, Plastic, Zipper, Reflective Nylon Cord, 2019

 
The Cleaner And The Cook,  Wooden Cleaning Supplies With Screen Printed Labels, a part of the artist’s installation at Vox Populi in 2018

The Cleaner And The Cook, Wooden Cleaning Supplies With Screen Printed Labels, a part of the artist’s installation at Vox Populi in 2018

Biography: Lucia Garzon is a queer first generation Colombian American multidisciplinary artist who received a BFA from Tyler School of Art in 2018. Lucia’s work talks about the intersectionality between identity and culture through personal experience as a child of Immigrants. Focusing around the themes of labor, immigration, and family identity, Lucia navigates through personal narratives about her family arriving and creating foundation in the United States and the ‘immigrant work’ which American society has forced upon them. Working mainly in performance and installation Lucia aims to shed light on the often invisible and silent stories of South and Central American immigrants. Lucia is currently living and working in Philadelphia, PA.

Lucia's practice often includes garment construction, wood working, video, installation, and printmaking. With lack of outside funds and institutional support Lucia often resorts to using recycled material and showing smaller works in group shows. Lack of space and funding often forces the impact of Lucia's work to be much smaller than the artist intention.